Tuesday, January 22, 2013

How I Cook Ogbono Soup with Okro

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Ogbono is a taboo for Asaba people, according to my dad. My dad was a traditional man, though a Christian, and I loved that he kept us grounded to our culture. The story goes that back in the days, Asaba people could eat whatever they liked including Ogbono. Most of them followed traditional religion, and were worshippers of Onishe, a river goddess.

Onishe treasured purity, and her color was white, which meant that all her followers only came to her shrine wearing akwa ocha. On a certain day, a man ate Ogbono, unknowningly stained his clothes and still came to worship. Onishe was not happy, and banned the drawy soup ingredient since it made her worshippers sloppy and dirty. Since then, a lot of people discarded it from the menu.

We grew up in Enugu, but my parents, from their own parents, were used to not cooking or eating Ogbono. My mum made her okro soup with enough okro and vegetable to thicken the sauce. So ogbono was not something I was used to until I went to boarding house, where without it, our soups would have become rivers of water with oil floating on top. Of course I exaggerate, but you get the idea.


I didn't mind the taste, and when nothing happened, my superstitious mind relaxed. Still, it wasn't until university when I ate an amazing ogbono soup made by one of my classmates that I really began to love and pay attention to what it really was and how it was cooked. By the time I moved into my own place and started making my food, it was decidedly on the menu. Enjoy my recipe below.


Ingredients

3 cups Ground Ogbono
5 pounds of your choice of beef, cut
2 large smoked mackarel/tilapia
1 medium onion, chopped
1 large tomato, diced in large pieces
2 tablespoons of ground crayfish
3 teaspoons of ground pepper
1 cup of palm oil
2 cubes of maggi
2 packs cut and frozen Okro (optional)
2 packs of frozen chopped spinach (optional)
Salt to taste


Directions

1. Blend two teaspoons of pepper, crayfish, onions and diced tomatoes and set aside.

2. Put the beef in two cups of water with half the onions, one cube of maggi, some salt and one teaspoon of pepper.

3. Bring to boil and then simmer for 20 minutes or until almost cooked.

4. Add your palm oil and heat until it starts to simmer.


5. Pour in your ground ogbono and stir till completely mixed up.

6. Simmer for the next 15 minutes. Make sure all the lumps are well blended into the oil and stock.

7. Add the pepper mixture to the ogbono.

8. Put in the smoked fish, add the other cube of maggi, check for salt and then bring to a quick boil.

9. Add the spinach and okro, then reduce the heat. Allow to heat till it begins to gently simmer, and then turn off the heat.


Your soup is ready. Eat with a side of poundo, amala (elubo) or eba. With the quantity of ingredients used in this recipe, you should have some leftover.

Like I mentioned in the ingredients section, the vegetables are optional, you can make ogbono without either, or with one and not the other. You can also use other vegetables like bitter leaf.

Enjoy!







24 comments:

  1. I love Ogbono.. my best soup :D... love it with poundo :)
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    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I prefer it with poundo, the Amala, eba not so much :)

      Delete
  2. Well, that's my sister.

    Every time I mentioned okra and ogbono soup cooked together people looked at me like I was crazy. Glad to know I'm not :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL...I also found out it's not common.

      Delete
    2. Really? I didn't know I was in the minority. I ALWAYS cook ogbono with okro. The first time I saw someone cook ogbono with green leafy vegetable, I was actually quite shocked. Your dish looks good.

      Delete
    3. This is how we cook ogbono soup too
      My mum never misses adding some okro to her recipe
      Looks really yummy :)

      Delete
  3. I usually cook Ogbono with just leafy veg, but this looks good, like it's somthing to try. Thanks for sharing, Myne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope it goes well for you. Do let me know.

      Delete
  4. Ogbono with okra or vegetable is good to go. This your soup looks yummy.

    ReplyDelete
  5. yum yum!
    We didnt really cook Ogbono soup growing up. Rather it was Okro and ugu (plenty of it at that) with Ogbono as the base. For extra crunch, momsy adds ugba.

    I love the flavor of ogbono, but egusi remains my first soup love :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love ogbono and okra. For me it always has to go together. This looks yummy

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
  8. Soup looks fresh and healthy, yummy. I always wondered why Asaba people don't eat ogbono, now I know. Thanks Myne.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I never knew about Asaba people not eating ogbono soup. I was first raised with ogbono soup, then every other kind of soup followed. I make mine just like yours, and enjoy eating it with pounded yam or semo. Lol!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thank you all, I appreciate your comments :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is the first time I have ever heard of ogbono. Probably very hard to come by on this end of the world. Which is really sad, cause that soup looks to die for and I absolutely LOVE okra. Fingers crossed I cen get some :)So want to try it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can also make Okra soup with this recipe and no Ogbono, will share that one of these days.

      Delete
  12. Exactly what I need.
    My mum is an Ijaw woman, cooks Ogbono and okro very well. Unfortunately, I didn't learn and so I am suffering now.
    'Operation cook a soup' implemented.
    Thanks Myne.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Can u come and cook for me please?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Dis look rily good myne.....i rily dnt like ogbono bt wit wot am seein here,i will give it a trial

    ReplyDelete
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